8 Nonprofit Instagram Accounts We Love (and What They're Doing Right)

November 27, 2019  |  Richard Gabrintina

When scrolling through your Instagram feed, you might come across fancy avocado spreads atop slices of artisan bread or exotic vacation landscapes more often than not. However, the popular app also offers the potential for nonprofits to deeply engage with their audience. In fact, nonprofits receive the second-most Instagram engagement of any industry, outperforming food and drink, health and beauty, fashion, and more. The photo and video-driven app boasts 1 billion monthly users, so if your organization isn’t already using it, you should start planning for how to integrate Instagram into your marketing strategy.

If you’re looking for inspiration on how to effectively use the app and engage with your audience, check out some of our favorite nonprofits accounts, handpicked by our staff:

@charitywater

"I recently became a donor of theirs via an ad on Instagram stories. They had a clip from a 20-minute mini-documentary that they put together for their sustainer program called “The Spring”. The clip is very well shot and edited, and if you swipe up you can watch the full video. It was compelling enough to keep me engaged for 20 minutes, and resulted in my monthly donation."

— Davis Stone, Advocacy and Social Moments Specialist

 

@yeswecanwf

“I love this photo from the Yes We Can World Foundation's Instagram because you can clearly see the positive impact they have on their clients. They have a great overall Instagram presence too, and make it easy to learn more about their organization in their saved stories, which spotlight events and ways to donate.”

— Renee, Email Marketing Manager

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM 🚌🌎🎉 MUSEUM TRIP (Post 1 of 6) . Alongside our Mobile Schools program we are excited to launch our complementary program “Beyond The Classroom” where kids get to travel and explore new places they wouldn’t normally have access to due to resources, access, or other obstacles. . For 80% of the kids in our program this was their FIRST time visiting a museum 😍 (check out their faces once we arrived 😍). . At this time we couldn’t be more excited to share our partnership with El Trompo the Children’s Interactive Museum in Tijuana, Mexico. This partnership opens the door for migrant children to access a state of the art museum while on their migrant journeys and enter a world of wonder and exploration so many more kids can be exposed to the magic of museums, science and technology @trompomuseo . Thank you so much to Rosario R. Director of El Trompo for this kind invitation for the kids at @yeswecanwf 🥰 We will be back very soon to explore other exhibits in the museum ❤️ . And a big thank you as well to Vince Young and his company @warriortermite for sponsoring this visit 🎉 . El Trompo’s mission: 🌎 Is to learn through interactive experiments the concepts of science and technology in everyday life and to better understand the world in which we live in 🌎❤️ We love this mission! . 📸 by our amazing photographer @thetriangleshow . . . #YesWeCanWF #YesWeCanMobileSchools #YesWeCanTijuana #ElTrompoMuseo #museum #childrensmuseum #migrantchildren #joy #happy #science #experiments #technology #stem #kids #kidsinstem

A post shared by YES WE CAN WORLD FOUNDATION (@yeswecanwf) on

 

@yellowfund

“They don't mince words and their text posts are reflective of that.”

— Grace Duginski, Junior Nonprofit Content Strategist

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Don't forget...

A post shared by Yellowhammer Fund (@yellowfund) on

 

@amnesty

“I think this is an effective use of Instagram because it strongly reflects Amnesty’s mission through compelling visual and narrative storytelling. This specific post has over 8,600 views, but overall their account consistently engages with their audience. One of their practices I’ve observed is how they usefully take screenshots of their tweets and post it on their Instagram account—it’s a smart way to connect their channels and to generate content at the same time!” 

— Richard Gabrintina, Nonprofit Content Strategist


@natgeo

“They use the platform to further their brand of high-quality photographs and tell detailed stories with the captions. It’s both visually captivating and really educational about a variety of topics!”

— Gabby Weiss, Digital Content Editor

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Photo by @paulnicklen | A humpback whale descends into the depths of Gerlache Strait, in Antarctica, to gorge on krill. Much further north in the opposite hemisphere, this past spring and summer saw over 121 grey whales washed up dead on shores in North America, from California to Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. This was the highest recorded whale die-off in 20 years. Scientists believe massive oceanic animals are starving to death and speculate that it’s because food sources are vanishing, or changing their behaviors, in the dramatically warmer waters triggered by climate change. The global effects of climate change are no longer a discussion for the future, we are experiencing a radically and rapidly changing planet. Follow me @PaulNicklen to learn how you can make a difference for the health of the ocean and the future of our shared planet. Shot on assignment for @NatGeo. #TurningTheTide #ExtinctionEndsHere #WhaleTail

A post shared by National Geographic (@natgeo) on

 

@theconservationfund

"They have beautiful pictures that truly tell the story of who they are."

— Ashley Early, Account Executive

 

@nature_org

"The Nature Conservancy’s Instagram posts combine high-quality, professional, and aesthetically pleasing photography with informative captions, comprising a comprehensive viewing experience that I thoroughly enjoy. Another feature of The Nature Conservancy’s Instagram that stands out is the lack of donation pandering and brand promotion among their posts. Often times, nonprofit Instagram accounts are filled with posts promoting events, success stories, and infographics as content to engage followers. However, The Nature Conservancy uses art and aesthetics as their strategy to capture audience attention, which to me is preferred. It feels less corporate and more personal, which is how nonprofits should interact with their constituents."

— Aaron Mok, Researcher

 

@kaboom

"If you’re a volunteer, [this video] is a great way to see your efforts being used.

If you’re a supporter, the images and videos they share give you a clear insight into how they meet their mission, that “Play Matters for All Kids.”"

— Ben Duda, Strategic Account Executive

 

Two-thirds of total Instagram audiences are aged 34 years and younger. It’s the most used social media platform for Gen Z and the second-most used platform for millennials. Looking for more information on how to understand these two generational groups? Check out our handy guide on Millennials & Gen Z.